Christian Mayne

Stonehouse Heritage Trail

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 2, The Royal Naval Hospital Boundary Wall

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 2, The Royal Naval Hospital Boundary Wall

The Hospital was completed in 1762. Its unique design of separate ward blocks, linked together by a covered walkway around a square, was an innovation in its time. During these early days some sailors were pressed men. Once sent to hospital there was an irresistible opportunity to try to escape. To prevent this a high wall was built and guards mounted at the gates and at major vantage points throughout the Hospital
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 3, The Rope Walk

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 3, The Rope Walk

Before Neswick Street was built there was a rope walk constructed on this site in about 1800. The length of a rope walk was usually 600 feet (180 metres). At one end of the walk one person would turn the 'spinner' to which the 3 or 4 'braids' were fixed. He also controlled the tension while another person walked backwards from the other end of the walk, holding the 'top' that would weave the 'braids' together to form the rope
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 4, James & Rosewell Lead and Paint Works

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 4, James & Rosewell Lead and Paint Works

The Works was built in the 1880s. It supplied sheet, pipe, white lead, putty, solder, oil, varnish, zinc, etc. mainly for the gas, water and roofing Industries in the Plymouth area. Working conditions in lead works were dangerous, involving the handling of corrosive substances and inhaling of poisonous fumes. As a result the life expectancy of a lead worker was far less than the average
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 5, Octagon Brewery

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 5, Octagon Brewery

By the late 19" century there were three major breweries supplying ales and beers for public houses throughout the Three Towns' of Plymouth, Stonehouse and Devonport. The Octagon Brewery was one of the many smaller ones started about 1899. It later owned many taverns throughout the 'Three Towns'. These Pubs displayed the distinctive brewery logo of an OB within an octagon shape. Some of the bottled favourites included OB Stout Pale Ale and Indian Pale Ale No1.
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 6, Phoenix Hall Roller Skating Rink

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 6, Phoenix Hall Roller Skating Rink

Rollerskating took England by storm and by the late 19 century Plymouth had half a dozen rinks. In May 1880 the Phoenix Hall Rink was one of the last to open. Another rink. Pavilion New Skating Rink. was located nearby in Martin Street. Various skating prizes could be won. These were usually silver cups or medals but on special occasions, prizes could even include live chickens or a pig to take home!
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 8, East Stonehouse Town Hall

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 8, East Stonehouse Town Hall

When the imposing Town Hall was built in the 1850s it was the tallest in East Stonehouse and was the centre of the Town administration. Sited next door were two other important buildings, the Fire Station and the Police Station. The Town Hall boasted a ballroom, measuring 40ft by 80ft and 40ft high perched above the offices. Sadly the whole building was destroyed by incendiary bombs during World War II.
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 10, No Place House

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 10, No Place House

This house first appears in the mid-17th century map alongside a boundary stone. This was the only house on this ridge alongside the leat with views over the Sound and creek. By the early 18th century the house grew into a quadrant structure, with free lined gardens that ran down to the creek's bank. Later in that century the house and its grounds were demolished to make way for the Royal Naval Hospital Cemetery,
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 13, The Monster Skating Ring

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 13, The Monster Skating Ring

Here stood what was known as 'Albert Hall' built in 1871; soon after it was known as The Royal Albert Hall. It was said to be an ugly building on the outside but very pretty and tasteful on the inside. Originally intended for concerts it could seat 2800 people and 4000 standing. By 1875 Thomas Martin the owner following a skating craze decided to put together the 'Monster Rink' here in the hall. It was later said to be the largest in the Westcountry
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 16, Stonehouse MIlls & Toll Gate

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 16, Stonehouse MIlls & Toll Gate

Sir Piers Edgcumbe of Stonehouse was able to build two mills and a new bridge c1525. This bridge with it's mills was built alongside an ancient causeway that used to link across the creek in the past. The mills would process grain for the making of bread and beer. The mills Were still going when in 1807 a toll gate with lodge was installed, much to the annoyance of the locals! By the early 1900s both The mill and toll gate had gone.
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 17, JWM Turner’s Stonehouse Pools Sketches

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 17, JWM Turner’s Stonehouse Pools Sketches

The world famous artist Turner was known to walk all over the West Country with his sketchbook. in 1813 he came along this creek, which he called Stonehouse Pools. He drew images of the creek with it's rural setting before it was populated by many Victorian houses. One of these is a small water colour showing the creek, mill and church steeples of Stoke Damerel and St Aubyn's in Devonport.
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 19, Convent of Notre Dame

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 19, Convent of Notre Dame

This ruin was is the only remnant left of the Convent of Notre Dame. The building was built on land soon purchased after the completion of the cathedral. By October 1865 the convent and girl's school for boarders had opened. Pupils from all over the world would come and stay at this fine establishment. By 1936/8 the convent premises took over the large old Presbyterian Chapel. During the Blitz of Plymouth this building and its chapel.
Stonehouse Heritage Trail 21, St Peter’s Church

Stonehouse Heritage Trail 21, St Peter’s Church

Eldad Chapel was first built here c1830 until it's demise 1846 when the chapel fell into disuse. In 1848 it was renamed Church of St Peter's, at the same a temporary hospital was built nearby to cope with the outbreak of cholera, which was nursed by a group of women who became Sisters of the Holy Trinity who were allowed to receive Holy Communion daily. In 1882 major works were done to the tower, etc. and then during WWII it was gutted, being finally rebuilt late-1950s.